Tag Archives: album review

Ralph’s Reviews: Timoteo – The Weight of the World

Timoteo (Tim Gehring) is a singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from the Allentown area. His latest, “The Weight of the World,” was released on June 25, an is the most recent of several self-produced, self-recorded efforts from the one-man band, who records all of the instruments and vocals on the four-song EP.

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Ralph’s Reviews: Andrew Dunn – The House Above The Factory

Andrew Dunn’s “The House Above The Factory” is a magical journey through life’s ups and downs, told in a way only Andrew Dunn can. The musical arrangements, the lyrics, and the excellent harmonies throughout the album are a true joy to listen to. The title track tells the story of life-changing events that alter the plans you laid when settling in to your first house, and how a house becomes a home.

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Ralph’s Reviews: Frank Porter – I Can Win

I’ve had the opportunity to see Frank Porter perform live on a few occasions and, in fact, had the pleasure of sharing the stage with him once a year or so ago. With that in mind, I already knew what Frank had to offer in the form of musical talent. I was anxious to get a taste of his latest project “I Can Win,” and I was certainly not disappointed in what I heard.

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Ralph’s Reviews: Stoney Run Group – Self-titled

Stoney Run Group’s self-titled album, released in October 2017, has a definite 70s vibe with a few twists, for a sound that can be described as psychedelic indie rock. There a some hints of reggae (“All the Reasons”), jazz (“Only Waiting For You”) and blues (“Red Car”). You can hear the influence of jam bands like Little Feat, The Grateful Dead, and Phish, without the long, drawn-out 20 minute delivery of a 5-minute song which is often pretty cool live, but not necessarily ideal listening in the recorded version.

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The Tuk Ten, Day 8: Rush – Clockwork Angels (2012)

Not all bands age well. This is true when the band’s career is less than ten years. Tastes change, people’s sensibilities change, fads die and new ones are born. Young rockers become old rockers, and the bloom falls off the rose. No one wants to see their dad rage along with power chords and lyrics about fighting the man.

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The Tuk Ten, Day 7: The Police – Synchronicity (1983)

Sometimes a band can become so commercially successful that their artistic merit vanishes underneath the fame. In the late 1970s and 1980s, the punk rock movement was sweeping across the UK and America in reaction to the psychedelic rock of the 1960s and the yacht rock that dominated radio in the early 1970s. Punk was simple and aggressive, and it didn’t care about airplay, or authority or convention.

The Police were a band that brought together several threads and wove them into radio friendly rock that was simply inescapable from their first album in 1977 onward. The Police were sui generis. There was no other band that sounded like them. From the first few notes or moments of a song, you could easily tell that it was a Police song.

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